History
Icon-add-to-playlist Icon-download Icon-drawer-up
Share this ... ×
...
By ...
Embed:
Copy
Facebook Twitter Rss
Carry the One Radio: The Science Podcast
Igniting Scientific Curiosity
Category: Life Sciences
Location: San Francisco
Carry the One is a small team of young scientists at UCSF who are passionate about bringing science stories straight to the public's ear in an entertaining, digestible way. Tune in for stories ranging from current research to science history, from med ...more
Carry the One is a small team of young scientists at UCSF who are passionate about bringing science stories straight to the public's ear in an entertaining, digestible way. Tune in for stories ranging from current research to science history, from medical science to the natural and social sciences. -- Visit us at carrytheoneradio.com Twitter: @CTORadio Instagram: @carrytheoneradio To support the show: www.patreon.com/carrytheone
100x100_12827689
Science is one of the most powerful influences in our lives. The medicines we use, the foods we eat, the technologies we have –...


by Carry the O...
x
take it with you
Iphone5s_trans go mobile with Podomatic's new iPhone app.
don't have an iPhone? no problem »
x
loading results... Loader
loading results... Loader
x
No results found.
October 12, 2020 01:01 AM PDT

Science doesn't happen in a vacuum, and racism both in science and society contributes to disparities in the health outcomes of Black Americans. In this episode of The Spotlight, we talked to Dr. Debora Kamin Mukaz about her work studying how social factors and biology converge to affect risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Hear about her journey into epidemiology, and what doing this research means to her.

For more info about the two examples of mistreatment of Black people by the scientific establishment referenced in this episode, visit carrytheoneradio.com/episodes/yss-7

October 04, 2020 09:50 PM PDT

Are you tossing and turning all night? Well, what’s the secret to a good night’s sleep, anyway? And what really is the answer to Billie Eilish’s album, When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?

In this episode, we talk to Dr. Ying-Hui Fu, a professor in the Department of Neurology at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Fu has been researching sleep for decades, and her book Sleep to Thrive is available now. Our conversation with her revealed why it’s important to prioritize sleep in our busy schedules and that there’s so much we can discover from people who can sleep fewer hours and still lead high-functioning, productive lives. She also let us in on the answer to whether dolphins really sleep with one hemisphere of their brain “awake.” Tune in to learn more!

This episode was written and produced by Katie Cabral, Kanchi Mehta, Cindy Liu, and Li Wang. Music in this episode is from the Blue Dot Sessions and Baby Relax Channel on YouTube. Cover art courtesy of Cindy Liu and Kanchi Mehta.  

More Resources
UC Berkeley researchers identified a unique EEG signature that occurs during REM sleep: Brain noise contains unique signature of dream sleep.

September 21, 2020 09:12 AM PDT

How do our brains know who’s boss? In this Young Scientist Spotlight, neuroscientist Dr. Nancy Padilla tells us how she studies social dominance in mice. In the process, she walks us through her journey from college in Puerto Rico to postdoctoral research in California, sharing lessons learned along the way. We can’t wait for you to meet this rising neuroscience star!

This episode was produced by Celia Ford. Music used in this episode is by Blue Dot Sessions on Free Music Archive. Episode art by Ben Mansky. A full transcript is available at tinyurl.com/nancy-padilla-ep.

Dr. Padilla also produces her own podcast! Check out Stories of Women in Neuroscience (www.storiesofwin.org) to hear more interviews with brilliant women doing outstanding science.

Image Description: An Erlenmeyer flask filled with red liquid sits in a pool of light in front of an orange background.

September 08, 2020 10:00 AM PDT

These days, homeopathy and some forms of alternative medicine fall soundly in the realm of pseudoscience. Not only that, but the wellness industry has capitalized on the popularity of these practices in predatory ways, selling promises of improved health with no evidence to back them up. In the United States, the marketing of these alternative ‘wellness’ products primarily targets women – evidenced by yoni eggs, vaginal steamers, and more. If we turn back the clock about 150 years, however, homeopathic medicine didn’t look so different from the techniques being practiced in the medical mainstream. There was one important distinction, though – homeopathic medical colleges were more welcoming to women. Join us as we trace the complicated relationship between feminism, healing, and alternative medicine from its origins to the present day.

This episode was written and produced by Deanna Necula and Ben Mansky. The poem was read by Stella Belonwu. Music and sound effects used in this episode include Old Ralley by Lobo Loco, I Feel Sad by Scanglobe, and Discovery Harbor by Blue Dot Sessions on Free Music Archive and Chopping Vegetables from ancorapazzo on Freesound. For more information on sources referenced in this episode, visit carrytheoneradio.com/episodes/homeopathy.

August 03, 2020 12:35 PM PDT

If you live in an earthquake-prone area, there's probably one question on your mind a lot of the time: when is the next big one going to hit?

In this episode, we talk earthquake prediction with Dr. Barbara Romanowicz, a geophysicist at UC Berkeley and the former director of the Berkeley Seismology Lab. And while earthquake prediction is definitely important, our conversation revealed to us that there's so much more we can learn from earthquakes. Earthquakes (and their sister natural phenomena volcanoes) can teach us about the history of the geography that surrounds us and the make-up of the Earth beneath our feet. And just like any good science, earthquakes can reveal even deeper questions than we knew to ask before.

Strap in and join us for a wild ride through the center of the Earth, with stopovers in California, Japan, and on the newest Hawaiian volcano.

This episode was written and produced by Anna Lipkin, Cindy Liu, and Kanchi Mehta. Music in this episode is by Blue Dot Sessions, Kai Engel, Ketsa, and Six Umbrellas from the FreeMusicArchive. Episode art from Public Domain Vectors.

July 20, 2020 08:13 PM PDT

“You just do things differently and that's fine!”

In the fifth Spotlight, UC Berkeley's Jen Pearlstein talks about her research on how stress affects decision making, how she's making mental health care more accessible, and being a disabled scientist. Find her on Twitter @JenPearlstein and check out her blog, Voicing Vulnerability at http://voicingvulnerability.blogspot.com/. For more of Jen's writing about being a disabled trainee, read her paper linked below:

Pearlstein & Soyster (2019). Supervisory Experiences of Trainees With Disabilities: The Good, the Bad, and the Realistic

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Peter_Soyster/publication/335074084_Supervisory_experiences_of_trainees_with_disabilities_The_good_the_bad_and_the_realistic/links/5e161d6f92851c8364bbba7a/Supervisory-experiences-of-trainees-with-disabilities-The-good-the-bad-and-the-realistic.pdf

Music by Broke for Free, Blue Dot Sessions, and Ketsa - from FreeMusicArchive.
Episode art by Ben Mansky.

July 20, 2020 08:01 PM PDT

“You just do things differently and that's fine!”

In the fifth Spotlight, UC Berkeley's Jen Pearlstein talks about her research on how stress affects decision making, how she's making mental health care more accessible, and being a disabled scientist. Find her on Twitter @JenPearlstein and check out her blog, Voicing Vulnerability at http://voicingvulnerability.blogspot.com/. For more of Jen's writing about being a disabled trainee, read her paper linked below:

Pearlstein & Soyster (2019). Supervisory Experiences of Trainees With Disabilities: The Good, the Bad, and the Realistic

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Peter_Soyster/publication/335074084_Supervisory_experiences_of_trainees_with_disabilities_The_good_the_bad_and_the_realistic/links/5e161d6f92851c8364bbba7a/Supervisory-experiences-of-trainees-with-disabilities-The-good-the-bad-and-the-realistic.pdf

Music by Broke for Free, Blue Dot Sessions, and Ketsa - from FreeMusicArchive.
Episode art by Ben Mansky.

July 06, 2020 10:56 AM PDT

Artificial intelligence guides nearly every aspect of our lives: what TV shows we’re recommended, whose opinions we see on social media, what we buy, how we invest our money...the list is endless. But what does “artificial intelligence” mean? What do these algorithms know? If we could look inside a robot’s mind, would we see a reflection of ourselves? Dr. Dan Yamins, Dr. Kim Stachenfeld, and Dr. Grace Lindsay helped us explore what it means to be intelligent, and what separates humans from machines.

This episode was written and produced by Celia Ford, Devika Nair, and Li Wang with editing help from the rest of the CTOR team. Music used in this episode by Blue Dot Sessions and sound effects from FreeMusicArchive. Cover image courtesy of Ben Mansky.

July 01, 2020 10:44 AM PDT

Global Health in the Time of COVID is a miniseries from the Institute for Global Health Sciences at UCSF produced by Carry the One Radio. Each week, we speak to health experts at UCSF to learn more about them, their work, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed their practice and research.

In this week's episode, we talk to Dr. Madhavi Dandu, a clinician and professor of medicine at UCSF who directs the Master’s Program in Global Health, and Dr. Elizabeth Fair, an infectious disease epidemiologist who directs UCSF’s PhD Program in Global Health. We discuss how the COVID-19 pandemic has altered the course of Global Health education, why the US’s pandemic response has fallen short, and what we can learn from looking abroad.

This interview took place on May 28th, 2020 and reflects the state of the news and scientific literature at that time.

This episode was produced by Ben Mansky and Nancy Cai. Music used in this episode: Slow Lane Lover, Dance of Felt, San Diego Sunday, and Hundred Mile by Blue Dot Sessions. News clips used in the introduction are courtesy of Cleveland Clinic via the CDC.

June 24, 2020 01:33 PM PDT

Global Health in the Time of COVID is a miniseries from the Institute for Global Health Sciences at UCSF produced by Carry the One Radio. Each week, we speak to health experts at UCSF to learn more about them, their work, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed their practice and research.

In this week's episode, we talk to Alexandra Keir, Jane Fieldhouse, Dr. Lucia Abascal, and Maeve Forster, who are students and staff in the UCSF Global Health Sciences program. Since March, they have been working as part of the team behind Research Watch, a project to rapidly summarize new COVID-19 research and communicate it to healthcare workers, scientists, and policy makers. In our interview, we discuss the project, the challenges associated with staying up to date in an ever-changing field, the differences between responses to COVID-19 across the globe, and the major takeaways of the research that's been done so far.

To learn more about Research Watch and sign up for their newsletter, head to https://globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu/covid-19/ucsf-ighs-covid-19-research-watch
This interview took place on May 20th, 2020 and reflects the state of the news and scientific literature at that time.

This episode was produced by Katie Cabral and Ben Mansky. Music used in this episode: Slow Lane Lover and Hundred Mile by Blue Dot Sessions. News clips used in the introduction are courtesy of Cleveland Clinic via the CDC.

loading more... Loader
 
x

take it with you


Iphone_trans Listening to podcasts on your mobile devices is extremely convenient -- and it's what makes the podcasting medium so powerful.

You can take your favorite shows and mixes with you anywhere, but to do so requires some quick and simple steps.

Let's walk you through that process together.
step 1:


Click the "Subscribe With iTunes" link in the page's sidebar:

Subscribe_with_itunes

This will require that you have the iTunes software on your computer.

(You can download iTunes here.)
step 2:
Itunes_ss

Now that you've subscribed to the podcast on iTunes, the feed will display in your "Podcasts" section on the left navigation bar.

Click there and you'll see the show displayed in the iTunes browser.

You can "get all" to download all available episodes or just individual episodes.
step 3:


Plug your mobile device (iPhone, iPad, iPod) into your computer with the Dock Connector cable, and click the device in iTunes's left navigation bar.

Itunes_ss2

Once you have your device highlighted, click "Podcasts" in the top navigation bar and sync the podcasts you want on your device. Click "apply" and the episodes you have downloaded on your iTunes software will sync with your device.
that's it!

The beauty of this process is that now, every new episode of your subscribed podcasts will automatically sync to your device every time you plug it in and open iTunes. You can now take your favorite shows with you everywhere you go.

Enjoy!
done!
x

subscribe to this podcast

Rss-icon RSS
Itunes-icon iTunes